Vox Populi

Posts Tagged ‘tort deform’

How expensive is it to file a Medical Malpractice claim?

In broken tort reform, debunking the myth, Get the Ca$h, ideology, medical malpractice, undo tort reform on May 9, 2012 at 7:31 pm

Inherent in any claim is the cost of bringing the action.  Who is going to pay is the question, cutting both ways, in every

The Barrister's Dream

The Barrister’s Dream (Photo credit: Bonnetmaker)

case.  Will the medical practitioner/institution pay its fair share for the pain, suffering and death it/they inflicted?  Will the plaintiff pay the cost of bringing suit in an environment where the odds are greatly stacked against her?  The real answer is too often on the latter.  The plaintiff, hurt, injured or dead (the survivors seeking justice) will, all too often, bear the costs of trying to obtain justice.

Please be advised that under Michigan’s ethical rules, all costs of litigation (copies, postage, deposition fees, expert fees) are the ultimate responsibility of the client, even under contingent fee arrangements.   All of our clients sign written detailed fee agreements (citation).

So, you walk into a Med Mal attorney‘s office, or are wheeled in or such, and immediately you are, gently it is hoped, brought up to realize a strict and brutalizing reality: if the stars do no align, you will be the one on the hook for the pleasure of the experience.

It is well thought, although incorrect, that the plaintiff attorney will bear the costs of bringing suit.  With that line of reasoning, the argument runs like this: since the costs of litigation are high, and the plaintiff’s attorney takes such cases on a contingency basis, then the plaintiff attorney will only take the “valid” or “non-frivolous” cases as the plaintiff attorney will be on the hook for all of the costs of bringing the case (copies, postage, deposition fees, expert fees).

That commonly held belief is incorrect.  Patients are victimized by their physicians and then by the judiciary.  Once bitten, twice bit.

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Hot Coffee, torts and the Greater Good

In broken tort reform, debunking the myth, ideology, Think tank, undo tort reform on October 25, 2011 at 8:01 pm

It wasn’t until after I posted, what I thought was a rather eloquent comment, that I realized that the conversation over the documentary Hot Coffee over at the defense-attorney run site Abnormal Use had run itself out back in September and that, alas, my wise words were to go to waste.

So, I am reproducing them here:

I find both the initial “review” and especially the comments at times insight and always engaging.

A few items: a “review” turns to an apologetic when ideology intrudes. I fear this turns toward the latter.

The tort system, as one commenter has noted, works when a jury level-sets the community standard which, over time, settles into a remarkably fair system for recourse and redress. That is, if it is left to regulate itself. Already, at least in my state, there are court rules that define frivolous as well as the penalties for presenting one. Anything else is just biasing the judiciary, which helps no one.

But there it is, the communal tone that, yes, underlies my comments–the larger good should be noted. With “tort reform,” the right to redress malpractice (which is one of the only real means of eliminating harmful physicians) becomes harder, even to the point that rights are neglected, bad medicine continues and protective and beneficial policies and procedures go unaddressed.

Was the coffee too hot? No, the coffee, which is supposed to be “hot” was, actually, “scalding” (for those who work with the plain language of statute, this should not be too quickly overlooked).

I do not order scalding coffee, nor do I have a reasonable expectation of doing so. I have an expectation of getting hot coffee just as I have the reasonable expectation that when I see a physician I will receive care and aid. When this doesn’t happen, then my open avenue to recourse allows me, a single individual, to influence the system, however minute, toward a greater benefit for both myself and others.